Self-Transcendence Six and Ten Day Races

Results 2013

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The 18th Annual Self-Transcendence Ten-Day Race (April 17-27) and 16th Annual Self-Transcendence Six-Day Race  (April 21-27), 2013

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What Happened At the 2013 Race...

Photos 2013:

Great photos of the race by Prabhakar, Yatkara and Anurakta...

sahishnu.JPG scoreboard.JPG start 10 day.JPG
martin fryer.JPG nirbhasa.JPG smarana.JPG
day 4 runners.JPG dorian fryer.JPG kaneneka.JPG
  Runner Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10
1 Martin Fryer 106 190 261 329 399 462 526 591 660 720
  day total 106 84 71 68 70 63 64 65 69 60
2 Ananda-Lahari Zuscin 100 182 241 301 358 418 479 542 592 662
  day total 100 82 59 60 57 60 61 63 50 70
3 Volodymyr Hlushchuk 87 151 217 276 323 386 446 500 559 628
  day total 87 64 66 59 47 63 60 54 59 69
4 Nirbhasa Magee 65 125 185 240 295 348 402 464 531 622
  day total 65 60 60 55 55 53 54 62 67 91
5 Andrey Khachaturov 67 128 184 245 305 361 413 470 536 605
  day total 67 61 56 61 60 56 52 57 66 69
6 Teekshanam Dodonu 72 134 197 250 299 351 416 453 520 570
  day total 72 62 63 53 49 52 65 37 67 50
7 Andrey Andreev 72 136 190 237 289 347 392 452 522 565
  day total 72 64 54 47 52 58 45 60 70 43
8 Oleksandr Kharko 73 133 198 258 321 380 430 489 550 564
  day total 73 60 65 60 63 59 50 59 61 14
9 Upakaraka Tolstopyatenko 75 135 193 250 307 360 411 461 511 558
  day total 75 60 58 57 57 53 51 50 50 47
10 Michel Gouin 64 114 164 214 265 315 366 416 466 527
  day total 64 50 50 50 51 50 51 50 50 61
11 Mark Dorion 81 127 172 212 258 298 342 394 448 517
  day total 81 46 45 40 46 40 44 52 54 69
12 Sergey Kuzmin 64 128 179 231 287 340 382 422 462 510
  day total 64 64 51 52 56 53 42 40 40 48
13 Usika Muckenhumer 72 130 161 204 240 288 338 386 446 503
  day total 72 58 31 43 36 48 50 48 60 57
14 Ales Pliva 80 131 170 212 254 294 334 374 418 475
  day total 80 51 39 42 42 40 40 40 44 57
15 Prabala Carvalho 80 117 170 227 272 324 372 408 451 472
  day total 80 37 53 57 45 52 48 36 43 21
16 Andrei Somov 57 105 148 190 232 273 317 360 408 456
  day total 57 48 43 42 42 41 44 43 48 48
17 Chakradhara Caslava 71 119 159 204 246 286 327 367 409 450
  day total 71 48 40 45 42 40 41 40 42 41
18 Padyatra Komak 60 110 157 198 238 276 315 352 393 435
  day total 60 50 47 41 40 38 39 37 41 42
19 Smarana Puntigam 80 130 181 211 246 276 328 360 393 415
  day total 80 50 51 30 35 30 52 32 33 22
20 Sumahat Strohn 62 104 143 180 213 262 292 330 365 407
  day total 62 42 39 37 33 49 30 38 35 42
21 Frederick Davis III 80 135 159 185 255 300 301 361 400 402
  day total 80 55 24 26 70 45 1 60 39 2
22 Patanga Cordeiro 56 92 126 157 191 220 251 288 321 365
  day total 56 36 34 31 34 29 31 37 33 44

Women's Results

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Final results:

  Runner Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10
1 Kaneenika Janakova 83 156 224 288 353 420 485 551 620 686
  day total 83 73 68 64 65 67 65 66 69 66
2 Ilvaka Nemcova 90 152 212 273 335 396 456 514 576 642
  day total 90 62 60 61 62 61 60 58 62 66
3 Elena Kareva 82 147 203 262 317 374 430 475 539 602
  day total 82 65 56 59 55 57 56 45 64 63
4 Shamita Achenbach-Konig 94 160 224 286 335 390 444 495 543 593
  day total 94 66 64 62 49 55 54 51 48 50
5 Vasuprada Funk 66 123 172 220 274 322 381 441 499 565
  day total 66 57 49 48 54 48 59 60 58 66
6 Pati Ibinova 78 130 187 237 291 333 391 450 500 545
  day total 78 52 57 50 54 42 58 59 50 45
7 Giribhu Muhs 74 129 177 227 270 294 338 397 457 514
  day total 74 55 48 50 43 24 44 59 60 57
8 Yashasvati Plyavinskaya 64 114 162 215 260 306 355 394 451 502
  day total 64 50 48 53 45 46 49 39 57 51
9 Gudrun Freier 52 102 147 194 240 284 329 378 423 473
  day total 52 50 45 47 46 44 45 49 45 50
10 Vinati Docziova 72 116 167 218 251 293 339 376 418 469
  day total 72 44 51 51 33 42 46 37 42 51
11 Niribili File 70 114 158 207 257 300 347 378 416 448
  day total 70 44 44 49 50 43 47 31 38 32
12 Anna Khimchinskaia 56 103 154 201 241 282 321 362 396 435
  day total 56 47 51 47 40 41 39 41 34 39
13 Sara Schmidt 60 107 151 194 235 272 311 358 381 417
  day total 60 47 44 43 41 37 39 47 23 36
14 Tirtha Voelckner 75 123 165 210 253 297 336 337 337 337
  day total 75 48 42 45 43 44 39 1 0 0
15 Bigalita Egger 36 58 58 58 58 58 58 58 58 58
  day total 36 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Men's Results

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About the author:

Tejvan organises short-distance running and cycling races for the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team in his home city of Oxford. He is also a very good cyclist, having won the National hill climb championships in 2013 and finished 3rd in the National 100 Mile Time Trials in 2014.

The last few seconds!

 

Wow, look at those trophies?

 

The Morning of the Last Day!

Friday, April 26: One More Day!

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Wednesday Morning, April 25

April 24: Morning at the Counting Area

Wednesday Morning, April 25: Goodbye to the Cold Weather

April 24: Morning at the Counting Area

 

The Dugout Area of the Camp

Tuesday, April 23: Inside the Runner's Kitchen

Day 2 of the Six day race

3am at the race

First day

About the author:

Rupantar has been the race director of the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team since 1985, having been asked by Sri Chinmoy to serve in that capacity. As well as working on the big races the US Marathon Team organise each year - the 3100 Mile Race and the Six and 10 Day Race - he also spends a considerable amount of time archiving the Marathon Team's 40 year history on this website.

Notes and Observations from the Race Course- by Arpan De Angelo

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Yesterday it was quite chilly but the cold winds died down compared to the weekend. When the sun comes out and the wind dies down it is more comfortable for the runners and they can spend more energy running without having to struggle keeping warm. Also the general lack of rain this year has been a blessing for the runners as rain can make life a bit miserable and more challenging out on the open and exposed race course.

Working in the medical tent can be an eye opener into the lives of the runners. The problems and the joys of running most of the day and night are revealed more readily when the runners are resting or being treated in the comfort and warmth of the medical tent. Some of my stories will be derived from excerpts of runners’ comments as they are resting or being treated in the medical tent.

When I have time I also try to do a few laps with some of the runners to keep them company and let them express themselves a bit about their experiences. It may get a bit lonely out there for some of the runners although most seem quite content going around on their own most of the time. But when they do have someone to talk to some of the runners offer interesting words of wisdom as they freely offer tales of their experiences here.

dorion.JPGOne person who is quite fluent in expressing himself about his race experiences here is our great friend and runner Mark Dorion. He is an American runner from El Paso, Texas who comes here every year to run or to help with the Ten Day Race. He has run and raced at all distances for over three decades and has run in many of our SCMT races over that time span as well. (Photo by Prabhakar).

As a ‘senior’ runner who has slowed down quite a bit since his speedy days of yore, Mark still embodies the enthusiasm and energy of a dedicated runner who understands and manifests the principle of self-transcendence.

Having had serious operations and procedures on his foot in the past few years Mark has to struggle with keeping pace to stay in a race as long as this one. He is doing the Ten Day race as a personal challenge to keep in shape and stay in the racing spirit even though he has had to walk most of the time this year.

While walking with me for a few laps Mark has offered some brilliant observations about the course here. One of the things that one usually does not see on the race reports is the activity of animal life in and around the course as the runners spend most of their days and nights going around the one mile loop in this large park in the middle of Queens, New York City.

Mark was telling me about the animals that he has observed ‘sharing’ the park with all of the runners. Some of them are more common than others and are expected to be seen in a park like this. Squirrels, raccoons, ducks, dogs and all kinds of birds are plentiful here this time of year. Other unexpected animals that have been spotted are skunks, porcupines, muskrats and rats. It could be quite shocking for a runner, especially at night, to encounter one of these more unusual animals. But since the animals are used to seeing people and are foraging for the leftover food from picnickers, etc., they just go about their own business usually unafraid and non-threatening if they not provoked by people.

Mark also related that he sees more animals in this park than when running on trails out West. He said,  “In a trail race people are making noise as they are running and they just focus on the trail as the animals hide in the bushes trying to avoid them. Here in the park they are all out because they go for the trash and the muskrats go back and forth to the lake.”

geesler.JPGJohn Geesler also offered an observation on the movement of the animals here. John is one of the Six Day runners who have won the Six Day race here a few years ago. He also was the American record holder of the 48 Hour Race until a year ago when Phil McCarthy, another runner in this year’s Six Day Race broke his American record. (Photo: Prabhakar).

John was saying that this is a flyway at this time of year and the birds heading north see this giant greenbelt and they come down to the lake. Cardinals, robins, geese, ducks and other birds come here a lot especially this time of year to share the park with these human beings who play games here as well as those who are ‘strangely’ circling around and around a one mile loop in this beautiful setting.

I would like to end with a few personal observations about Monday, April 22 here a the park, which was the end of the fifth day and beginning of the sixth day for the Ten Day runners and the end of the first day and beginning of the second day for the Six Day runners.

Sunday’s start was sunny but chilly for the Six Day runners. A whole day and night have gone by and this new group of runners have begun to tire and slow down from their faster and more energetic pace of the first few hours. Most of the Ten Day runners who have been on the course four more days than the newer runners have gotten used to the slower pace and the more frequent intervals of rest breaks and medical stopovers.

The medical tent is a great place for some runners to get out of the cold or wind or rain, although today it was not raining nor was it as windy as it had been a few days ago. It is more comfortable there than in most of the tents or dormitory facilities, so it is a place where runners get a quick break, a massage and check the status of their feet, legs, etc.

Working in the tent allows me and others who help the runners to get a really good feel for what is happening in the race. Although I have run this and other multiday races a number of times, it is more revealing to see what others are going through by working in the medical tent and spending time with each runner.

Today I spent nine hours there off and on as I would also accompany some of the runners around the course for a lap as well to see how they are doing. In that time span I, as well as other masseurs, doctors, chiropractors, etc. had seen many runners. Most of the runners so far do not have any serious problems or injuries or else they would not be allowed to stay in the race. Only one person had to drop out due to health problems. But there are always minor aches and pains and slight injuries that should be dealt with as they keep on schedule to cover as many miles as they can.

Most of the problems are muscle soreness and things such as blisters, tightness, tiredness and other temporary discomforts. Sometimes we may have to deal with a few mental problems such as lack of motivation, but in general the runners all seem to really want to enjoy the race.

As time goes on in both races now the frequency of runners stopping into medical is increasing. Yet all the runners seem in good spirits and are excited about getting back out on the course and moving forward towards their goals.

I will offer more accounts and observations from ‘medical’ as the race proceeds.

About the author:

Rupantar has been the race director of the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team since 1985, having been asked by Sri Chinmoy to serve in that capacity. As well as working on the big races the US Marathon Team organise each year - the 3100 Mile Race and the Six and 10 Day Race - he also spends a considerable amount of time archiving the Marathon Team's 40 year history on this website.

List of Runners as of March 30, 2013. Total runners in 6 & 10 Day Races is 78. The maximum numer of participants is 80.)

Six-Day Runners: Men (30)

 1. Lynn Dharbhasana 35 Auckland, New Zealand
 2. Lebedyev Stutisheel 42 Kiev, Ukraine
 3. Oberkehr Bob 58 Northvale, NJ, USA
 4. Reisecker Priyavadin 43 Salzburg, Austria
 5. Rios Luis 65 Brooklyn, NY, USA
 6. Saraz Baladev 37 Bratislava, Slovakia
 7. Ward Ken 55 Corvallis, OR, USA
 8. Collinson Rasmivan 44 Bristol, UK
 9. Hanes Steve 56 Westfield, PA USA
10. Ionov Syona 42 Kiev, Ukraine
11. Vasilchenko Mikhail 47 Omsk, Russia
12. Brenio Sergei 37 Simferopol, Ukraine
13. Lebedev Sergei 36 Kaliningrad, Russia
14. Khuzhin Rinat 53 Chelyabinsk, Russia
15. Konstantin Rybin 39 Perm, Russia
16. Gaspar Pedro 41 Coimbra, Portugal
17. Hlac Peter 41 Cecejovce, Slovakia
18. Griboh Dennis 20 Diehireh, Luxemburg
19. McCarthy  Philip 44 New York, NY, USA
20. Swenson Alex 48 Vashon, WA, USA
21. Stringer Pete 71 Osterville, MA, USA
22. Wilson Salil 48 Jamaica, NY, USA
23. Komelkov Sersei 53 Chelyabinsk, Russia
24. Fountain Daulot 56 Seattle, WA, USA
25. Zincarini Sandro 27 Porto Sant Elpidio, Italy
26. Martel Roger 56 Wickham, Quebec, Canada
27. Limbu Kumar 39 Flushing, NY (Nepal)
28. Jakelaitis    Rimas 58 Brooklyn, NY (Lith.)
29. Gessler John 54 Johnsonville, NY
30 Winkley Don 75 Corpus Christi, Texas

Six-Day Runners: Women (19)

 1. Cunningham  Dipali 54 Jamaica, NY, USA
 2. Abramovskikh Jayasalini 32 Moscow, Russia
 3. Kuchkarova Elena 42 Moscow, Russia
 4. Stebneva Mattali 56 St. Petersburg, Russia
 5. Morison Karnayati 66 Ottawa, ON, Canada
 6. Pustogowa Suparna 49 Munich, Germany
 7. Zub Ratuja 35 Minsk, Belarus
 8. Khisamoutdinova Pratishruti 69 Smolensk, Russia
 9. Scheucher Sumeru 53 Graz, Austria
10. Gaile Gundega 36 Riga, Latvia
11. Manecke Tejini 25 Burgsball, Germany
12. Ketova Yulia 23 Perm, Russia
13. Eliseeva Anna 49 Perm, Russia
14. Psyukalova Larisa 51 Chelyabinsk, Russia
15. Makowka Punita 53 Geneva, Switzerland
16. Kamalan Subala 28 Brisbane, Qld, Australia
17. Boisvert Sylvie 50 Quebec, Canada
18. Gundega Gaile 36 Riga, Latvia
19 Jevdokimova Litaf 57 Kerava, Finland

 

Ten-Day Runners: Men (21)

  Last Name First Name Age City/Country
 1. Fryer  Martin 51 Weston, ACT Australia
 2. Puntigam Smarana 40 Vienna, Austria
 3. Hlushchuk Volodymyr 52 Vintsa, Ukraine
 4. Muckenhumer Usika 45 Salzburg, Austria
 5. Kharko Oleksandr 49 Kiev, Ukraine
 6. Andreev Andrey 47 St. Petersburg, Russia
 7. Somov Andrei 33 St. Petersburg, Russia
 8 . Tolstopyatenko Upakaraka 45 Moscow, Russia
 9. Davis III Frederick 65 Cleveland, Ohia USA
10. Strohn Sumahat 32 Burghausen, Germany
11. Carvalho Prabala 45 Saint-Cyr-L'ecole, France
12. Dodonu Teekshanam 37 Geneva, Switzerland
13. Pliva Ales 35 Prague, Czech Republic
14. Komak Padyatra 38 Stupava, Slovakia
15. Khachaturov Andrey 50 Dubna, Russia
16. Kuzmin Sergey 40 Nizhniy Novgorod, Russia
17. Cordeiro Patanga 29 Sao Paolo, Brazil
18. Magee Nirbhasa 34 Dublin, Ireland
19. Gouin Michel 52 Drummondville, Quebec, Canada
20. Dorion Mark 53 El Paso, Texas, USA
21. Caslava Chakradhara 38 Zlin, Czech Republic
 

Ten-Day Runners:

Women (15)

   
 1. Janakova Kaneenika 43 Slovakia
 2. Nemcova Ilvaka 32 Prague, Czech Republic
 3. Kareva Elena 37 Volgograd, Russia
 4.  Achenback-Konig     Shamita 48 Vienna, Austria
 5. Funk Vasuprada 32 Rosenheim, Germany
 6. Plyavinskaya Yashasvati 47 St. Petersburg, Russia
 7. File Niribili 67 Auckland, New Zealand
 8. Ibinova Pati 48 Irkutsk, Russia
 9. Schmidt Sara 33 Den Haag, The Netherlands
10.  Khimchinskaia Anna 35 Moscow, Russia
11. Egger Bigalita 72 Culver City, CA USA
12. Voelckner Tirtha 41 Munich, Germany
13. Freier Gudrun 41 Tubingen, Germany
14. Muhs Giribhu 42 Berlin, Germany
15. Docziova Vinati 35 Kosice, Slovakia

From the 2013 Six and Ten-Day Brochure:

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About the author:

Rupantar has been the race director of the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team since 1985, having been asked by Sri Chinmoy to serve in that capacity. As well as working on the big races the US Marathon Team organise each year - the 3100 Mile Race and the Six and 10 Day Race - he also spends a considerable amount of time archiving the Marathon Team's 40 year history on this website.

6 and 10 Day-Tales From Medical and Other Comments

I usually arrive at the Six and Ten-Day races around 5:00 pm after the runners have spent a full morning and afternoon of running/walking/eating/resting since I last saw them. When I leave to go home around 1:00 a.m. after offering massages to the men who are about to go to bed for the night there are very few runners or helpers out on the race course. Most of those late-nighters are usually walking or running quite slowly. The contrast in the energy and excitement on the course between those two times is quite remarkable.

The runners have had mostly sunny days in this race. When there were clouds covering the sky most of the time it did not rain as in past years. So having a relatively dry race is one boon that the runners can really appreciate and feel grateful for. The nights do get very cold though, and sometimes it is very windy. This can make running and walking quite uncomfortable and difficult, especially near the lake, which offers no protection from the cold, harsh winds.

Coming into the medical tent after a full day and long evening on their feet as they struggle with the weather, tiredness and their own bodies’ limitations and aches and pains, some of the runners feel a great relief and joy. Besides the fact that the medical tent is usually the warmest place on the racecourse, they know they will be cared for as they lie down in a protected and comfortable environment.

I have been working off and on in medical tents at our multiday races since they began in 1985. When I say ‘off and on’ I mean that I have also run in these races so I have developed a good appreciation of the medical tent from the runner’s perspective.

Although I am not a certified masseur, doctor or chiropractor, I have been doing massages for over forty years and have also learned how to treat certain running ailments and health problems related to running.

One of the most important things to observe when a very tired and sore runner comes into the tent is how they are walking, breathing, talking and if they seem faint or disoriented. Most of the time they just come in to lie down, get a massage or take care of blisters.

Lately though I have also been treating some inflamed muscles and tendons such as shin splints and Achilles problems.

In normal day to day life if a runner would have some of these problems you would tell them to stop running for a few days or weeks until they healed. In most cases in this race if the injury is not too serious we will take care of the problem enough so they can at least keep walking. Some of them eventually do start running again after some time.

One night the medical tent was really busy with ‘patients’ and three and sometimes four of us were taking care of them as they came in and out in a steady stream for hours. Dr. Sakhshat Flowers, a good friend, member of the SCMT and an M.D. with his own practice and clinic in New Jersey, was in the tent diagnosing problems and helping to treat the more acute ones. He had a special laser device to facilitate tissue healing and circulation and whatever else it does. The rest of us who were ‘less technical’ did our usual massages, taping, blister treatments, etc.

One runner from Germany had a very inflamed shin splint. Dr. Sakshat worked on it with the laser and then I massaged it to drain out some of the fluid or lymph, which naturally rushes to an injury to help promote healing in that area. I also iced it and taped it to support it when he walks, but at this point it was very late and we just wanted him to elevate it and rest it.

He had been resting for a few hours lying down and finally needed to get up and go to sleep in his own tent. As he sat up he turned white and started to faint and we then took care of that somewhat scary condition by elevating his legs and lowering his head. We gave him some water to drink when we saw that he was not unconscious and after checking his temperature, pulse, etc. let him rest some more. By then it was 1:30 a.m. and I had to leave so we made sure he drank water regularly and had someone check up on him regularly. One has to be very careful of dehydration when involved in so much physical exercise even after stopping.

The next day when I came back in the late afternoon I knew that he was all right. I saw him walking quite briskly looking very energetic and strong.  He had walked over a marathon that day already and was looking forward to running into the night. I did get to see him again in the medical tent later that evening and worked on his shin splint once more. After a short rest he was out on the course again moving quite well.

This kind of story is similar to many of the multiday runners who are strong enough to endure these kinds of physical and mental challenges. Of course those with more ultra marathon experiences as well as those who have trained properly will not experience problems that are debilitating and can rebound from their ailments quickly. Some runners’ problems may become too intense or severe so they are first recommended to take longer rests and then to drop out of the race if it is too serious and a risk to their health and well-being.

Surprisingly of the 82 or so runners who started both races only two that I know of had to leave the race due to health or injury problems. With less than two days to go until the end of the race most of the runners have adapted to the aches and pains of these challenge and are quite happy as they overcome each obstacle. Outwardly they make look tired and not be smiling all of the time, but there is a certain and real contentment inside the runners who are able to endure until the end. This becomes more obvious as the goal fast approaches.

Surprisingly some of the runners are now actually getting stronger. This amazing phenomenon occurs in races as long as these when the body seems to adapt quickly after the initial shock of the long days of movement on their feet. The runners who do not adapt and just have to struggle with their weaknesses are usually those with less experience, background and training. But their achievements, as well as those who have had to stop altogether before the end of the race, never goes unrewarded.

The heroic attempts of all of the runners who make it to the starting line are greatly appreciated by others. Their own efforts, whatever the result, will make them stronger not only as runners but also as individuals who wholeheartedly devote themselves to a worthy goal and strive with all of their effort to achieve those goals, whether they fall short sometimes or not.